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The April 13-14 2018 Tornado Outbreak was a devastating tornado outbreak which was a two day outbreak which affected the Midwestern and Southern Untied States with the strongest tornado being an EF5 tornado which hit Larwenceburg, Tennessee on April 14, 2018 damaging and destroying everything in it's path.

Meteorlogical Synopsis

On early April 13 large warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico, and large cold air from Canada caused a tornado outbreak for the Midwestern and Southern United States. As a result of a tilt in the surrounding air that the low created, allowing for a dry line to form over much of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and northern Arkansas. Also allowing the SPC to issue a high risk for those states on April 13. The dry line also increased the likelihood for another significant weather event on the next day April 14. On April 14 the SPC issued a High risk for Western, Middle and the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee also spreading into Central Alabama, North Eastern Mississippi and North Western Georgia with the dry line those areas. This also caused the threat for Strong-Violent long-tracked tornadoes for those areas in the high risk. Later in the day dew points reached the upper 60s and lower 70s for those areas in the high risk area on April 14. Then later in the day Violent tornadoes struck Alabama with a EF4 tornado in Tuscaloosa-Birmingham, Alabama also with another EF4 tornado in Jackson, Mississippi and another EF4 in Tupelo, Mississippi, and an EF4 tornado in Atlanta, Georgia. Most tornadoes during the outbreak were EF4s EF0s and EF1s with one EF3 tornado in Memphis, Tennessee and one EF5 tornado in Lawernceburg, Tennessee which destroyed everything in it's path. Also CAPE values reached 1600 J/kg while dry air intrusion was on the rise increasing the threat for severe weather.

Confirmed
Total
Confirmed
EF0
Confirmed
EF1
Confirmed
EF2
Confirmed
EF3
Confirmed
EF4
Confirmed
EF5
25 10 5 2 2 5 1



Tornadoes

List of Confirmed tornadoes on April 13, 2018An EF3 tornado in St. Louis damaged or destroyed houses and trees and caused mostly window damage in Downtown St. Louis, this picture was taken by a storm chaser in a TIV before he intercepted the tornado. This tornado lasted from 3:30-4:00 PM.An EF1 tornado in Indianapolis caused minor damage to houses and trees in its path the tornado as 2 miles wide just short breaking of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado. This tornado lasted from 4:00-4:20 PM. An EF0 tornado in Cincinnati, Ohio caused no damage but was seen by a storm chaser, but this tornado did cause power lines tor fall down but nothing else besides power lines. This tornado lasted from 4:30-4:45 PM.An EF2 tornado caused damage north of Indianapolis, Indiana in fact the tornado destroyed the farm that's in the picture. In the farm 1 soil drain got destroyed and 2 tractors were thrown 1 mile, This could be a low end EF3 tornado but is rated EF2 by NWS. This tornado lasted from 5:00-5:30 PM. List of Confirmed tornadoes on April 14, 2018An EF3 tornado caused significant damage to Memphis, Tennessee damaging or destroying houses and trees causing windows to blow out in Downtown Memphis. This picture was taken West of Downtown Memphis. This tornado lasted from 1:00-1:30 PM.An EF4 tornado caused major damage to Tuscaloosa and Birmingham, Alabama destroying or damaging houses and trees in both Downtown areas. This is a picture of the tornado at peak intentisty in Downtown Tuscaloosa. This tornado lasted from 2:30-3:35 PM.An EF4 tornado in Jackson, Mississippi caused major damage to homes and trees. This is a picture of the tornado nearing EF4 strentgh as an EF3 tornado. This tornado lasted from 3:30-4:35 PM.An EF4 tornado in Tueplo, Mississippi caused major damage to homes and trees. This is a picture of the EF4 tornado nearing Tueplo. This tornado lasted from 4:00-4:30 PM.An EF4 tornado in Nashville, Tennessee caused major damage to the Downtown and East Nashville areas. This is a picture of a hook echo in Downtown Nashville where the EF4 tornado is. This tornado lasted from 4:30-5:00 PM. This the first EF4 tornado to hit Nashville since offical records. This tornado also tracked towards North Nashville between 14th Ave N and Heiman St. This tornado also took a silmar path as the Nashville EF3 tornado in 1998.An EF5 tornado in Lawernceburg, Tennessee casued major damage and destroyed houses and mobile homes in it's path from Wanye to Lawrence counties. This tornado caused 5 deaths and 100 injuries. This is a picture of the supercell before the EF5 tornado formed. This tornado lasted from 5:00-5:35 PM. An EF4 tornado in Atlanta, Georgia caused major damage which destroyed houses and mobile homes. At 7:00 PM the tornado formed in downtown Atlanta at EF0 strength which manly broke glass on skyscrapers. Then at 7:30 PM the tornado reached EF4 strength and heavily damaged the The Weather Channel Building causing it to lose its power and its weather radar which took 1 year to rebuild. This tornado lasted from 7:00-8:00 PM.An EF2 tornado in Joplin, Missouri caused severe damage and destroyed mobile homes and also caused manly roof and wall damage to homes. This was one of the strongest tornadoes in Joplin, Missouri and caused $245 billion dollars in damage. This tornado wasn't as strong as the EF5 back in 2011. This tornado lasted from 5:30-6:30 PM. An EF1 tornado in Jefferson City, Missouri caused minor damage to homes and uprooting trees. This tornado lasted from 5:30-6:45 PM.An EF0 tornado in Little Rock, Arkansas caused power poles to snap and leaves to get stripped off of trees. And also caused minor damage to mobile homes. It also caused windows to blow out on skyscrapers in Downtown Little Rock. This tornado lasted from 4:45-5:35 PM.An EF1 tornado in Knoxville, Tennessee caused minor damage to homes and moblie homes, and even caused cabins to flattened. The tornado even caused tons of trees to snap in forests and woods. The tornado even caused windows to blow out in Downtown Knoxville. This tornado lasted from 5:00-5:30 PM.An EF0 tornado in Gatlinburg, Tennessee caused minor damage to the town, and picked a gas can and threw 10 miles into the woods causing a wildfire which lasted for a 1 month. This tornado lasted from 4:00-5:00 PM.An EF1 tornado in Cookeville, Tennessee caused minor damage to houses and uprooted trees in the woods. This tornado lasted from 4:30-5:00 PM. An EF1 tornado in Chattanooga, Tennessee caused minor damage to homes and mobile homes, and caused windows to blow out in Downtown Chattanooga. This tornado lasted from 5:30-6:00 PM.An EF0 tornado in Wilmington, North Carolina caused minor damage to homes and mobile homes and did some minor damage to some docks on the coast as it was a waterspout. The tornado did do some minor damage to skyscrapers in Downtown Wilmington. This tornado lasted from 4:00-5:05 PM.An EF0 tornado in Jacksonville, Florida caused minor damage to homes and mobile homes blew many beach equipment around. This tornado also picked up sand that was thrown 10 miles into the city. This is the second waterspout of the outbreak. This tornado lasted from 5:00-5:30 PM.An EF0 tornado in Orlando, Florida caused minor damage to homes and mobile homes and broke glass on skyscrapers and did minor damage to Disneyland, closing it down for the next 2 days. This tornado lasted from 4:30-5:45 PM.An EF0 tornado in New York City caused minor damage to houses and skyscrapers and stripped leaves off of trees. This tornado lasted from 6:00-6:15 PM.An EF0 tornado in Washington D.C. caused minor damage to the White House and President Donald Trump was taken to safe place, but the tornado passed over into the ocean turning into a waterspout and dissapated. This tornado lasted from 1:00-1:25 PM.An EF0 tornado in Boston, Massachusetts caused minor damage to the Skyline and caused minor damage to homes and mobile homes. This tornado lasted from 3:35-4:00 PM.An EF0 tornado in Baltimore, Maryland caused minor damage to homes and stripped leaves off trees. This tornado lasted from 6:00-7:00 PM.

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